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Village LED Streetlight Pilot Program Continues

LEDStreetLightThe Village LED Streetlight Pilot Program is continuing after an extension of time to allow for a new fixture to be included. This new fixture was released by one of the Pilot fixture manufacturers and included material improvements to the previous fixture being piloted. LED pilot streetlights are installed in a number of locations throughout the Village. Pilot lights are installed on three sections of White Plains (Post) Road, two sections of Mamaroneck Road, Heathcote Road, Tisdale Road and Springdale Road. A map of each Pilot location is attached. 

We want to hear what residents think about the lights! This phase of the Pilot will continue for the next three months to mid-October. Resident feedback is important in helping the committee determine which fixtures to recommend to the Village Board of Trustees. Please send any comments or questions to LED@Scarsdale.com or drop off comments at Village Hall at the LED comment box located on the first floor counter. Subject to the results of this phase of the Pilot, the following streets are being considered for an upgrade to LED streetlights: White Plains (Post) Road, Heathcote Road (Post Road to Five Corners), Mamaroneck Road and Weaver Street (note: some lights on Weaver Street have already been converted to LEDs by the City of New Rochelle). In addition to these streets, locations with Town & Country Style post- top fixtures (see attached picture) are also being considered for an LED upgrade. These locations include parts of the Crane Berkeley and Secor Farms neighborhoods as well as a few other Village streets.

Background of the LED Committee and work completed to date: On April 28, 2015, the Board of Trustees established an Ad Hoc Committee to research Light Emitting Diode (LED) street lights in order to improve lighting, reduce Village costs for electricity and maintenance, and conserve energy. To that end, the Committee was asked to develop a pilot program and make a recommendation on how best to move forward. The Committee conducted extensive research on LED street lighting, met with vendors, examined LED streetlights installed in neighboring communities and tested various fixtures to determine the proper lights and locations to pilot in Scarsdale.

Based on the Committee's research and Scarsdale's predominant residential setting, we believed it important to test a variety of lights including some with warmer, less bright colors than have been installed elsewhere. In the fall of 2015 the Committee installed lights of varying color and brightness on three streets in Scarsdale: Fox Meadow Road, Madison Road and Heathcote Road. Based on the results of this sample and resident feedback, the Committee's proposal was to focus on two types of lights in Scarsdale as a first phase: lights on higher traffic streets and locations with Town & Country style post-top fixtures.

In July 2016 a Pilot was launched with fixtures installed on sections of White Plains (Post) Road, Mamaroneck Road, Heathcote Road, Tisdale Road and Springdale Road. During the Pilot one of the manufacturers of the Pilot LED Streetlights informed the Committee that an updated version of their fixture would be released in early 2017 with material improvements to the lighting. As previously noted, the Pilot was extended to allow for these updated fixtures and is now being continued.

Copies of the Committee's reports to the Board can be found at https://tinyurl.com/scarsled.

Scarsdale LED Streetlight Pilot Program - Press Release - 7.19.17

26 Cooper Road Stands, For Now

26CooperFrontA 1917 Country style home and garage (1926), thought to be designed by architect Frank Joseph Forster could be spared from demolition if a decision by the Committee for Historic Preservation (CHP) stands. On July 11, by a vote of 5-2, the committee voted to deny an application to raze the house and garage at 26 Cooper Road finding that the home meets one of the criteria for preservation, i.e. "That the building is the work of a master and embodies the distinctive characteristics of a type, period or method of construction that possesses high artistic value."

In a Memorandum Decision written by CHP Chair William Silverman, it states that the committee found that architect Frank Joseph Forster was indeed a master and that the home was an excellent example of Country style architecture.

About Forster, they said,

"Frank Joseph Forster is a famous architect with a large body of impressive work. Born in New York City on December 12, 1886, he studied architecture at Cooper Union from 1903 to 1908. This was followed by a year of study in Europe and after a short partnership with Edward King in 1910, he practiced under his own name beginning in 1912.26CooperGarage

Forster developed a reputation as a specialist in country house designs. Indeed, the Village of Scarsdale Cultural Resource Survey Reconnaissance Level Report refers to him (p. 29) as "an expert in the design of English-inspired houses" and quotes from his written work in describing that style of architecture (pp. 29, 34, 42). Aside from this property, the CHP is unaware of any other Forster designed structures (still standing) in Scarsdale.

The importance of Forster's work in American architecture is abundantly clear. The New York Times reported that Forster was one of three grand prize winners of the 1929 National Better Homes Architectural Competition, describing him as "a New York architect who has, through his country-house designs, established a national reputation as a specialist in residential work." His excellence was recognized by the Architectural League medal for domestic architecture in 1927 and 1929 and the Better Homes in America medal in 1933."

The architect's name did not appear on the plans for the 1917 home as was the custom at the time. However, Forster was called on to build the garage nine years later and the committee noted the architectural similarity between the two structures, which include , "chimneys, sagging roofline and gables." Moreover, they deemed it unlikely that an architect of Forster's stature would have undertaken the garage unless he had designed the original house.

26CooperPathThe committee found that "Both structures are dominated by a steeply pitched, cross-gabled roof with mock-sagging at the end of the roofline and dormers. The arrangement of windows of different sizes and shapes as well as the prominent chimneys and chimney pots on the main House are also classic traits of this style home. Significantly, both structures have not been materially altered since original construction."

Since Forster designed no other existing homes in Scarsdale, the committee believed that allowing it to be demolished would result in a significant architectural loss to the Village.

Therefore the application was denied. However, the owner does have the right to appeal to the Scarsdale Board of Trustees.

Fireworks And Fun On July 4th

donutfloatraceThousands of people crowded the Scarsdale Pool on June 29th to watch the spectacular and beloved fireworks show. The fireworks were visible from Crossway and Boulder Brook Field, which unsurpisingly were also packed with people. The Independence Day festivities continued at the Scarsdale Pool Carnival on July 4th. With the help of a DJ, lifeguards and swim instructors, there was a fun day of many activities including freestyle swimming races, parent-child swimming relay races, kick board races, donut float races, and a penny hunt. For those kids who were not aquatically inclined, there was a free-throw basketball competition and a giant blow up slide for them to enjoy. With extra staff on hand, there was individual face painting and Fourth of July themed temporary tattoo application. The kids loved the events and especially loved seeing lifeguards dressed as some of their favorite animated characters, Dory from Finding Dory, and Chase from Paw Patrol. In the spirit of the Fourth of July, there was also a lifeguard dressed as Uncle Sam. It was a fun-filled day for all!

fireworks2fireworks1Kids wait for their turn to participate in a kickboard raceFreestyle swimming race1st and 2nd place winners of the freestyle raceface painting scarsdale poolPenny hunt 2Kids line up to meet a character from a popular kids TV show Paw Patrolfloatrace One winner of the freestyle raceSlide 2

From Village Hall: Sale of Village-Owned Property, Knotweed Removal and Approval to Demolish 24 Morris Lane

schwabcheckphotoHere are a few items of interest from the Village Board meeting on Tuesday night July 11. You can watch the meeting in its entirety here:

32 Ferncliff Road: The Village announced the sale of a foreclosed home at 32 Ferncliff Road for $956,300. These funds will be placed in the Village's coffers and used for additional road repairs and the purchase of equipment including a new fire truck.

Knotweed: Scarsdale received a grant from New York State for $24,000 knotweedfor the removal of invasive knotweed along the south Fox Meadow watercourse in Harwood Park. This grant will be matched with monies from the school and village budgets as the watercourse is primarily on school grounds. The knotweed will be removed manually over a 7-month period.

Graffiti: Village Manager Steve Pappalardo announced that the state would remove graffiti from the Hutchinson river Parkway, between exits 20 and 22.

Food Scrap Recycling: The Village Manager announced that the village's new food scrap recycling program is a big success and 67,000 pounds of food scraps have been collected over the past six months and turned into compost. The Village is collecting approximately 2 tons of food scraps each week, and 750 food scrap kits have been sold to date. A similar program has been launched in Bedford and Mamaroneck, Larchmont, Greenburgh and New Castle will start their own programs in the fall.

24 Morris Lane: The trustees announced that they have approved the application to demolish 24 morris lanean 8,050 square foot, eight bedroom house that was built in 1917 at 24 Morris Lane. The trustees found that it met none of the criteria for preservation as it was a mélange of architectural styles and although notable, the former residents could not be considered to be figures of historical significance.

Gifts to the Library: The Village Board accepted two gifts for the library renovation – one check of $64,000 from the Friends of the Scarsdale Library and another for $50,000 from the Scarsdale Foundation. See photo above.

Fireworks Spectacular on Thursday June 29th, Carnival on July 4th at the Pool

julfourth9The Scarsdale Parks and Recreation Department have announced the annual fireworks spectacular and the July 4th carnival at the Scarsdale Pool Complex.

Fireworks Spectacular (Thursday, June 29th)

Scarsdale's Annual Fireworks Spectacular, open to the public, will be presented at the Scarsdale Pool on Thursday, June 29th, at 9:15 PM. Returning to the spectacular will be a performance by the Westchester Band at 7:30PM. Please note that a $2.00 fee will be charged to all non-pool members entering the pool starting at 5PM in conjunction with the scheduled fireworks. Beginning at 8PM ALL individuals entering the Pool Complex will be charged $2.00. Picnicking is allowed on the grounds, but alcoholic beverages and smoking are not permitted. Pool members wishing to avoid paying the $2 fee are advised to enter the pool facility before 8PM.

July 4th Carnival (Tuesday, July 4th)

Throughout the day on Tuesday, July 4th, there will be a variety of carnival attractions and aquatic games at the Scarsdale Municipal Pool between the hours of 11:00 AM and 4:00 PM. A DJ will be on hand playing music! Picnicking will be allowed in the pool complex during the day as well, but alcoholic beverages and glass containers are forbidden. 

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