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Sunday, Mar 26th

Last updateFri, 24 Mar 2017 3pm

You are here: Home Real Estate Three More Homes to be Considered for Demolition
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Three More Homes to be Considered for Demolition

47LincolnRoadThough preservationists bemoan the overdevelopment of Scarsdale, the construction of new, oversized homes does have a silver lining. – these new homes have contributed to an increase in Scarsdale's overall tax base – yielding higher revenues for the Village and the schools. In fact, the NYS Office of Real Property Taxes reports that the total assessed value of Scarsdale real estate has risen since last year -- which will allow an increase in the tax cap and funds for school programs and Village services.

This month, applications to demolish three more homes will be considered by the Committee for Historic Preservation on December 17th.

Here are the addresses:

20 Lenox Place, built in 193720LenoxPlace

47 Lincoln Road, built in 1922 (pictured at top)

2 Herkimer Road, built in 1937

Sales

35SheridanRoad35 Sheridan Road, Edgemont: Custom built center hall colonial set back from road on .86 flat, private acres with room for pool. Wonderful layout, spacious rooms, beautiful built-ins. One of the most desirable neighborhoods in Edgemont. Original owner - first time on market.

Sale Price: $1,170,000
Real Estate Taxes: $39,089

340HeathcoteRoad340 Heathcote Road: Wonderful expanded ranch in move-in condition. Set on .23 acre, the first floor features 3 bedrooms and 2.5 baths, an eat-in kitchen, a family room, a beautiful deck that stretches across the dining area and family room making this the perfect flow for entertaining. The second floor leads to a large Master Bedroom with a huge walk-in closet connecting to a large bath with Jacuzzi and glassed-in shower. A second room can be used as an office or nursery. The basement is finished and has another full bath, laundry and storage.

Sale Price: $1,093,000
Real Estate Taxes: $27,939

22RidgecrestEast22 Ridgecrest East: This dramatic Tudor has been tastefully updated and has incredible Old World character! Grand formal living room has 12ft+ ceilings and large, fieldstone fireplace. Gleaming wide-wood pegged floors, soaring cathedral stained and leaded glass windows, slate roof, picture moldings, beautiful stone walls, terraced gardens. Nicely updated eat-in-kitchen with door to patio and play areas. 2,140 square feet includes 4 bedrooms, 3.1 baths and flat grassy yard area.

Sale Price: $769,000
Real Estate Taxes: $19,135

Featured Listings:

HLChristieSmall400 Clayton Road, Edgemont: Renovated in 1997, this home has it all on over a half an acre. 400ClaytonRoadLarge eat-in-kitchen with two of everything. Spacious living and dining room both with fireplaces, first floor master suite and guest bedroom with hall bath and study with fireplace make for easy living. The second floor boasts three spacious bedrooms, two full baths and a 14' by 22' recreation/family room with stairs down to kitchen. French doors lead to rear patio. four-zone heat (radiant in kitchen and dining room, three-zone central air. Mature landscaping creates a private comfortable lifestyle. Learn more here:

List Price: $1,515,000

HLChristieSmall18 Argyle Road, Edgemont: Move right in to this picturesque English country home with rocking18ArgyleRoad swing front porch. Special features include gorgeous architectural details, beautiful hardwood floors, 2 new baths with stained glass windows, and new Camko roof. Large level property. Dramatic living room with beamed/vaulted ceiling and brick fireplace. Perfect just the way it is but also has potential expansion possibilities. Walk to elementary school, commuter bus to train, and shops. Learn more here:

List Price: $879,000

Comments   

0 #5 concerned 2013-12-19 00:42
NoGem, nothing that you mention goes to the issue of the Graves house's historical beauty. It is undeniably nicer than 95% of the big clunkers that have gone up recently.
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0 #4 Btmom 2013-12-12 07:08
Why not keep the facade, gut the interior, and expand. It would take more time but the curb appeal will remain which should satisfy the Village and the cost to re-landscape the front of the property would be substantially reduced.
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0 #3 No Gem.. 2013-12-12 05:13
The Graves' house is no gem. Anyone who wanted to put their money where their mouth is, had years to buy that house and renovate it..... Here's what you'd be facing.... It has cloth wiring, clay pipes, major envelope issues, asbestos, outdated heating and cooling, a wet basement and probably a leaky roof and extensive termite damage. The cost of renovating is almost double that of starting from the ground up. Why should the current owners have to FIX all of these problems? They should be able to start from scratch if that's what they want. IT'S THEIR HOUSE. The village has the right to have a say in what they build but not if they want to renovate or start over. Also, if you went to the meeting you would have seen that the drawing they submitted is for a beautiful brick colonial.
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0 #2 concerned 2013-12-12 03:49
Anyone know the status of the Graves house on Heathcote? If that gem is razed, it will reflect very poorly on our leadership.

Undoubtedly, it would soon be replaced with a faceless "neocolonial", "neoMediterraan ean" or other travesty - equipped with false fieldstone fronts and shingles or, alternatively, mediocre stucco more appropriate for a house in Long Island or Dubai - similar to those popping up in Murray Hill.
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0 #1 Increases in Assessments DO NOT increase tax revenues 2013-12-12 03:20
Joanne, you have things a bit off. The substantial increase in the assessed value of properties in Scarsdale you report does increase the allowable increase in tax levy growth under the tax cap. However, the increased valuation DOES NOT directly lead to increased tax revenues for the Village, the County, and the School District. Instead, only the distribution of the tax levy is affected -- i.e., who pays what amount. Thus, if you put on a large addition to your house, your assessed valuation will go up and your pro rata share of the tax levy will go up. But as a result of your paying more (based on the increased value of your property), your neighbors who have not improved their properties will now pay less. Its just a redistribution of the tax burden. This is a zero sum game. The danger, however, is that because the tax cap constraint is being eased because of the increased tax base, the Village and the School District may decide to INCREASE the tax levy to fund additional programs or items that they otherwise would have foregone by trying to comply with a lower tax cap amount.
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