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Thursday, Nov 23rd

Last updateWed, 22 Nov 2017 3pm

You are here: Home Real Estate Greenburgh Town Hall on Central Avenue Retail Vacancies
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Greenburgh Town Hall on Central Avenue Retail Vacancies

forent3A Town Hall meeting was called by Paul Feiner to discuss the future of Central Avenue on Monday night November 8th. The Town Board, the Planning and Zoning Boards, and the Planning Department were on hand to discuss issues with local realtors and property owners.

The purpose of the meeting was to brainstorm ideas on what Greenburgh could do to fill the vacant storefronts on Central Avenue, which have caused declines in tax revenues and mean less funding for school districts, fire district and town governments.

Approximately 50-60 people attended the meeting that was chaired by Town Supervisor Paul Feiner.

The loss of tax revenue from the vacancies is costing the town approximately $5 million per year. Those who spoke complained that parking restrictions are too stringent and need to be updated. They also reported that White Plains and Yonkers require fewer available spots per the size of the location as determined by the floor area ratio. They stated that the application process for variances need to be coordinated among Village Boards as it is now time consuming and frustrating for applicants.

In discussing the lack of restaurants, distance parameters from the street for fast food establishments along Central Avenue were cited as an obstacle. In addition, since Greenburgh requires a special permit to open a restaurant on Central Avenue, there is a long approval process that may discourage potential tenants.

Even more red tape prevents retailers from opening on sites where there are steep slopes, such as the Dilmaghani property that has been vacant for years. It was suggested that the steep slope ordinance be waived for properties along Central Avenue.

To make the street easier to navigate, some suggested that Central Avenue needs to be more pedestrian friendly and proposed the addition of sidewalks to make it easier to walk between retail malls.

In order to attract new businesses, attendees suggested that Greenburgh promote itself to the business community as a place where it is easy to do business. Others discussed the need for the town to balance tax revenues against the rights of residents who reside close to Central Avenue.

A new Comprehensive Plan for the area is in the works and portions of it are available for review on the town website at www.greenburghcomprehensiveplan.com

 

 

Comments   

0 #4 Diana 2010-11-21 09:13
And yes, once again, Paul Feiner tries to help contributor Dilmaghani, ignoring the enviromental violations on that property.
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0 #3 Dave 2010-11-17 04:56
Empty stores generally mean one of two things, the space is not marketable i.e. not configured properly and/or the area is over-retailed. There are a zillion cars going up and down central avenue and you can find pretty much whatever you want., except a fast food place or more than one diner. Theres too much retail, why bother opening more than one location if you're a smaller tenant already on Central avenue. Tenants would gladly pay the rent if they had the sales to support it. Bottom line, a 10 mile strip shopping center - which is what Central Avenue is, only works when you have a aggregation of tenants that can enjoy the traffic from one another, like the larger mall like areas.
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+1 #2 Cathy 2010-11-12 22:51
I think there are just too many retail spaces on Central Avenue. Rents are probably prohibitive as well. I would rather see more parks and green spaces.
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0 #1 Hugh Schwartz 2010-11-11 05:25
The problem is that the Town does not have an organized business development plan. We have an outstanding and very creative Planning Commissioner, but he does not have the time to do the business development. We need someone focused on bringing businesses to the twon and to act as ombudsman to help navigate the Town's regulations.

The special permit requirement does not have to be a long dragged out process. It can be one meeting with a public hearing at the discetion of the PLanning Board. Not all special permits carry the same issue.

Even when special permits are not required place remain vacant for a long time - like the Brasseros did (finally becoming a diner) and Mitty's (finally opening as a casual ding establishment).

Sometimes the process takes too long. But don't blame the process for all the empty stores on Central Avenue. SOmehow banks manage to get built with rather great frequency.

We need a business development program that attracts local ownership and we need a community that supports local businesses.

I would volunteer to chair a business development commitee if asked by the Town.
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